May 22, 2018

Being Unstoppable Is About Overcoming Obstacles

Life is not always a smooth and comfortable journey. In fact, you face obstacles on a daily basis, even though you don’t notice them anymore. From trying to convince your colleagues to choose a specific solution to wondering how to get back in touch with a distant relative, there are many challenges to overcome. However, while most people naturally try to pursue their goal when confronted to such everyday obstacles, there’s one area of your life where challenges are prone to happen and stop your efforts: The fitness world. Indeed, it’s a common error that you have to be already fit mentally and physically to start your fitness journey. While there is a virtuous circle, the fitter you are, the fitter you get, it would be foolish to assume that you can’t engage in sports activities if you’re not 100% strong. In reality, while illnesses can keep you away from your regular workout, there are health conditions that can only improve through regular exercise. Here are the many ways in which your health might seem to be an obstacle on your way to fitness, and the equally many reasons why it can never stop you from getting fit and doing the stuff you most enjoy. Here’s how to be unstoppable!


Too tired? Think again
Do you know what the most common reason for skipping the gym is? Tiredness. You think you can’t go before you feel drained and want to go back to bed. Fatigue can affect you at any point in your life, whether you’re working hard at the office or relaxing at home. Picture the scene. You set your alarm clock early to go the gym before work. But you can’t bring yourself to get up. ‘I’ll go tomorrow,’ you think, ‘I’m too tired today.’ However, tomorrow, you may just feel the same despite ensuring that you get an early night. What is that happening to you and how long should you postpone your training session? As surprising as it might sound when you adopt a passive lifestyle, your metabolism change and gets lazy. As a result, you feel exhausted even though you’re not doing anything. The best remedy against feeling tired is to exercise as this will kick-start your metabolism. Gradually, your body will feel more energized. However, if you can’t get rid of the sensation of fatigue after a few days of working out, you might want to see a doctor. Indeed, fatigue might be a symptom of hypothyroidism.


Gain without painDo you sometimes have the impression that your joints are stiff and that every movement is too painful to make? Joint pain, also known as arthritis, is a common health complaint caused by an inflammation of the joint tissues. Contrary to the common belief, arthritis is not an old age disease, even though it is most frequently found among seniors. A lot of people of all ages struggle with joint issues as a result of poor lifestyle choices, from picking sports that put too much pressure on the articulations – such as running which can be so harmful to your knees that you could need a total knee replacement – to not drinking enough water – your joints consists of 60% water, meaning that dehydration could affect them. Regular and gentle activity can also help to reduce joint pain and strengthen your muscles. Yoga, for instance, is an excellent choice to help release the pressure on your articulation.


Age is only a number
 
‘I can't do that. I’m too old for that.’

How often have you used your age as an excuse? If you’re still in your 20s or 30s, you might find yourself referring your age as a reason not to follow specific trends or wear young outfits. But when you hit your 40s, you can become aware of how much your fitness levels have dropped – especially if you haven’t trained regularly. Does this mean you’re too old for sports? Of course, not. There is no age to be doing sports, as long as you are careful. Robert Marchand, for instance, is a role model for active seniors. Born before the First World War, the Frenchman took on cycling after his retirement. Aged over 100, he set his first-hour record in the super senior category in 2012. Marchand has since stopped cycling at a competitive level earlier this year, but he still enjoys riding his bike. The lesson we can all learn from him is that there’s no age to start practicing

 




There is no such thing as a weak body
For too many individuals, the idea of an imperfect body, or a body that has been amputated or damaged beyond repair is terrifying. However, many paralympic athletes and talented sports people have since proven that the potential of the human body is without limit. Take a look at this dance routine performed by a three-legged duo, to see that your body is able to do much more than you give it credit for. In other words, your weak spot is no real obstacle. It’s only an excuse that you can push aside to focus on what you really want to do.


It starts in your mind
Ultimately, the power to overcome obstacles starts in your mind every day. You need to find in yourself the motivation to go further. As motivation is what gets you to push through a hard time at the gym; it’s important to nurture it. If you’re naturally competitive, you’ll find nothing more motivational that practicing to beat your competitor or to become stronger than that ripped bodybuilder at the gym. Some people find it easier to keep a journal in which they note their performance and the reasons why they want to get better.


Ultimately, the obstacles are between you and your happiness
As soon as you start practicing sports regularly, you’ll find that most barriers begin to fade and disappear. Indeed, sports releases a state of happiness and satisfaction. The more you practice, the happier you are. The happier you are, the easier it is to remove obstacles.


You may not be a great athlete. But you don’t have to be Number One to stick to your fitness journey. You have to believe that you can do it despite the challenges that are stopping from doing sports. The first step is all it takes to get your body fit again.



*This is a collaborative/contributed/partnered, compensated post. The copy, content, images & opinions are not my own.